Climbing Mount Beerwah

We recently had the joy of climbing Mount Beerwah with some friends. Mount Beerwah is set in the Glasshouse Mountains region of the Sunshine Coast, in Queensland Australia. More than just a bush walk or hike, climbing Mount Beerwah is probably the closest thing you can get to rock climbing without needing the ropes!

The views are absolutely specular, and I captured the following snaps during our climb:

View of Mount Beerwah from the carpark

Rock scrambling up Mount Beerwah, QueenslandScrambling up the rocks while climbing Mt Beerwah

Steep climbing up Mt Beerwah

First of all, it is a 2.6 km trail up from the parking lot, and takes at least 2.5 – 3 hours for a return trip. If you’re planning on giving it a crack, be sure to pack heaps of water (2 litres per person), sunscreen and snacks, and only attempt to climb Mount Beerwah in dry weather.

Looking directly up to the giant rock face above us. Looking directly up to the giant rock face above us.

View of the rock face from hiking up Mount Beerwah

How the Glasshouse Mountains Formed

Mount Beerwah is the highest of all the Glasshouse Mountains, rising 556 metres above sea level. On the history of the Glasshouse Mountains:

The Volcanic peaks of the Glass House Mountains rise dramatically from the surrounding Sunshine Coast landscape. They were formed by intrusive plugs, remnants of volcanic activity that occurred 25-27 million years ago. Molten rock filled small vents or intruded as bodies beneath the surface and solidified into land rocks. Millions of years of erosion have removed the surrounding exteriors of volcanic cores and softer sandstone rocks.

The range was formed as molten lava cooled to form hard rock in the cores of volcanoes 31  million years ago.
(Cohen, B. E., Vasconcelos, P. M., and Knesel, K. M., 2007, Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, v. 54, p. 105-125.)

View from the Summit

Outlook to the other Glasshouse Mountains from the top of Mount BeerwahOutlook to the other Glasshouse Mountains from the top of Mount Beerwah

View of Beerburrum State Forest from the summit of Mount BeerwahView of Beerburrum State Forest from the summit of Mount Beerwah

Watch out for the Bugs while climbing Mount Beerwah!

We enjoyed a moment of victory once we finally reached the summit, but his was short-lived, as swarms of flying ants quickly set on anything that moved. See the tiny dots in this photo:Flying ants at the summit of Mount Beerwah, Glasshouse Mountains Queensland-9

On the way back down

Finally, coming back down Mt Beerwah was quicker than climbing up it, but a different technique is used; I like to call it the spider crawl! Scrambling down the rock face on Mount Beerwah is quite challenging, particularly as you begin to feel both physically and mentally tired. The rocks are quite hot on the hands, and very smooth and slippery in parts.

Scrambling down the rock face on Mount Beerwah

Rocks and bushes on Mt Beerwah, in the Glasshouse Mountains

Walking up Mt Beerwah, Queensland

Did you enjoy the photos? Or have any other questions about climbing Mount Beerwah? Please leave a comment below. Thanks for reading! –Edwin

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